Journey of a Lifetime: Homeward Bound to Antarctica 2016

Nearly two years ago, on a cold and snowy January morning, I stood on the balcony of my condo in downtown Ottawa, Canada, making a two-minute video. Why? I was making an impassioned “balcony pitch” setting out the reasons I wanted to be a participant in the inaugural round of Homeward Bound, a 10-year groundbreaking leadership, strategic and science initiative for women, set against the backdrop of Antarctica. So, why was I, a woman with two graduate degrees and many years of great work experience, braving the snow and cold to make this video?

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Broadback River Watershed and adjacent area: Interactive Map

(2016-10-20) Global Forest Watch Canada (GFWC) is pleased to release an interactive map of the results of our analyses of Landsat satellite imagery to map anthropogenic (human) disturbance from 1980-2015 in the Broadback River watershed and adjacent area to the south and east. Results show a steady increase in the presence of industrial activities, especially related to the forest industry and the roads required to undertake logging.

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Expanding Human Disturbance Footprint in Quebec's Broadback River Watershed

(2016-10-20) Mapping analyses from satellite images shows that the Broadback River watershed, and the boreal forest to the south and east of it, experienced a significant expansion of human development between 1980 and 2015. The analyses, conducted by Global Forest Watch Canada (GFWC), examined the length of linear and area-based disturbances in the Broadback River watershed.

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Anthropogenic Disturbance in the Broadback River Watershed, Quebec (1980-2015)

 (2016-10-20) These datasets show the extent of anthropogenic disturbances mapped by GFWC in the Broadback River Watershed region based on Landsat imagery from 1980 to 2015. Three datasets are available for download: (1) linear disturbances; (2) polygonal disturbances; and (3) a dataset in which the linear and polygonal disturbance datasets were buffered by 500m to account for an ecological footprint and combined. The disturbance data in all three datasets is separated into 5-year time periods, from 1980 to 2015. 

 
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Bulletin: Time Series Analyses of Anthropogenic Disturbance in the Broadback River Watershed, Quebec

(2016-10-20) This bulletin presents the results of time series analyses of anthropogenic industrial disturbance in the Broadback River watershed in Quebec, as well as an area to the south and east. The results reveal a steady increase in both linear and area-based disturbances. Logging and associated road development are the most significant contributors to the cumulative growth of human impacts; however, there are still opportunities to ensure that further development is minimized in the watershed.

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Bulletins 2 & 3. Linear Disturbance in the Castle and Implications for Grizzly Bear and Trout

(2016-09-20) The second and third bulletins in this series on disturbance issues in the Castle Wilderness examine the length of linear disturbances and their density in the newly proposed parks. There was a total of 1,823 km of linear features (e.g. roads, trails, and transmission lines). The density of linear disturbances in the provincial park was 3.5 km/km2, while in the wildland provincial park it was just over 1 km/km2. Thresholds described in the scientific literature to maintain core habitat for grizzly bears are 0.6 km/km2 and 0.69 km/km2 for bull trout.  The third bulletin details findings of analyses regarding the density of disturbances in relation to grizzly bear habitat, as well as westslope cutthroat and trout habitat.

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Linear Disturbances in the Alberta Castle (2012)

(2016-09-20) Global Forest Watch Canada (GFWC) mapped linear disturbances in the Alberta Castle using ancillary data sources and air photographs from the summer of 2012, and then refined the dataset to categorize roads. This dataset was used in GFWC's analyses of the extent of linear disturbance and its impact on species at risk in Alberta's Castle region. The methodology used to create this data can be found in Bulletin 2.

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Human Footprint in Alberta’s Newest Proposed Parks Already an Issue

(2016-09-20) “Our analysis shows the extent of linear disturbances in the Castle is already too high to maintain or enhance ecological integrity, particularly in the proposed provincial park,” said Wynet Smith, Executive Director of GFWC. “Much of the linear disturbances need to be removed and rehabilitated if the Castle is to meet its ecological objectives of water security and habitat for species at risk.” 

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New Analysis Shows Proposed Castle Protected Areas Require Restoration

(2016-09-06) The proposed Castle protected area has been subject to fragmentation due to its long history of human use. However, it has the potential to protect some of the last remaining intact forest landscape fragments in the Southern Alberta foothills. As per GFWC’s results (which are summarized in its first bulletin on the issue), Executive Director Wynet Smith notes: “if we are truly to protect one of the greatest water sources and some of the most diverse habitat in Southern Alberta, the Government needs to actively restore this landscape.”  

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Bulletin 1. Anthropogenic Disturbance and Intactness in the Castle

(2016-09-06) -  This is GFWC's first bulletin in a special series on the Castle Wilderness, which is currently proposed for protection. As input to the management planning process for the new protected areas, GFWC has conducted analysis to update disturbance and intactness information for this important ecological region. This first bulletin looks specifically at fragmentation in the area - and provides some analysis of the intact forest landscape fragments (IFLFs) that remain. 


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